Building a Computer

I'd always advocate for building over buying a computer, you learn so much more about them and you understand more about how they function from getting into the guts and building it yourself. I've built a few in my time, though I openly admit I'm using a custom-upgraded Lenovo Erazer machine at the moment. I hope to build another one once I get the funds together, because modified or not this prebuilt just isn't suiting my needs. Also desperate to move onto the Ryzen platform, those things have just decimated Intel in the past couple of years...very appealing technology!
 
@Jayson - Even though I have never built one myself, this is something which I'm interested in learning. I'm going to build my next computer and in the meantime, I'll be watching some useful YouTube tutorials and tips. Are there any other good revision techniques that helped you learn?
 
Building your own gives you flexibility. More open room for future upgrades.

It's not much difficult if you know the basics. It's just putting together some parts. They all slot in, not much building required in fact. If you can source component cosst efficiently, It would be cheaper even.
 
@Jayson - Even though I have never built one myself, this is something which I'm interested in learning. I'm going to build my next computer and in the meantime, I'll be watching some useful YouTube tutorials and tips. Are there any other good revision techniques that helped you learn?

Never built one. I was just curious about others. Anyway, it's not my thing. I only like making websites etc.., not tearing apart the hardware.
 
@Jayson - Even though I have never built one myself, this is something which I'm interested in learning. I'm going to build my next computer and in the meantime, I'll be watching some useful YouTube tutorials and tips. Are there any other good revision techniques that helped you learn?
Much like @Davidisms said, there's not a whole lot to building a PC (well, unless you're looking into water cooling and custom loops and all of that fun stuff, that can get complex), so once you build your first, it's very easy to build another, with the chance to learn from what happened in the previous build. Watching tutorials (NOT THE VERGE ONE!) is a great first step and shows you just how straight forward it really is. If I can offer one other piece of advice, start putting together build lists on sites like https://pcpartpicker.com and get peoples' opinions on them. You'll learn how to build to a budget, how to build monstrous systems, or how to build a practical, functional desktop. You'll also learn a great deal about compatibility (Are you building for an ATX system, ITX, Mini-ATX, Micro-ATX? Are you going Intel? Make sure your mobo is a socket LGA1151! Going with AMD's Ryzen platform? Make sure your mobo is socket AM4! Don't forget to include decent memory, but if it's a gaming rig, focus more on GPU than CPU, while work rigs should focus more on CPU and memory than GPU...things like that). Once you get that down, you're good!
 
Who has built one? How much did it take to build it? How long did it take? What was the difficulty? How would you compare built computers to pre-built ones?
Well, the era of assembling clone computers are gone. Unless you are a gamer who really want a SUPER SUPER FAST computer with stellar GPU and out of this world Alien look!!

I would recommend buying a branded computer because the individual parts/ components have been tested to fit/match and work together as a system.

The last time I assembled a computer was back in 2010 when laptops were still expensive. But now, you'd rather get cheap core i5 refurbished laptop instead of assembling a monstrous PC that will have compatibility issues!

Just thinking!
 
Well, the era of assembling clone computers are gone. Unless you are a gamer who really want a SUPER SUPER FAST computer with stellar GPU and out of this world Alien look!!

I would recommend buying a branded computer because the individual parts/ components have been tested to fit/match and work together as a system.

The last time I assembled a computer was back in 2010 when laptops were still expensive. But now, you'd rather get cheap core i5 refurbished laptop instead of assembling a monstrous PC that will have compatibility issues!

Just thinking!
That's what sites like PCPartPicker are for, you can sort out compatibility issues before you purchase any parts and know that what you're buying will work. Realistically, the only parts you need to worry about in that regards are CPU, Mobo (socket) and heatsink (or AIO). The rest is essentially plug and play...I mean, that's hyperbole, obviously, but the point still stands.

Building a PC is typically cheaper (unless you're looking to build a monster gaming PC, with the prices of high end GPUs...then you're up there in prices), allows for better hardware value, and doesn't involve a boatload of bloatware from the pc manufacturer that you don't need.
 
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Well, the era of assembling clone computers are gone. Unless you are a gamer who really want a SUPER SUPER FAST computer with stellar GPU and out of this world Alien look!!

I would recommend buying a branded computer because the individual parts/ components have been tested to fit/match and work together as a system.

The last time I assembled a computer was back in 2010 when laptops were still expensive. But now, you'd rather get cheap core i5 refurbished laptop instead of assembling a monstrous PC that will have compatibility issues!

Just thinking!
Not much to assemble nowadays. So no compatibility issues. Basically you slot in five parts together. SMPS, Mother Board,. RAM, HDD, Processor. Only thing is to purchase right board for processor and right RAM for Board.
 
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